Yellowstone

It’s Wonderland. Old Faithful and the majority of the world’s geysers are preserved here. They are the main reason the park was established in 1872 as America’s first national park—an idea that spread worldwide. A mountain wilderness, home to grizzly bears, wolves, and herds of bison and elk, the park is the core of one of the last, nearly intact ecosystems in the Earth’s temperate zone.

  • World’s First National Park
  • 2,219,789 acres (Larger than Rhode Island and Delaware combined) 
  • Wildlife – 7 species of ungulates (bison, moose, elk, pronghorn), 2 species of bear and 67 other mammals, 322 species of birds, 16 species of fish and of course the gray wolf.
  • Plants – There are over 1,100 species of native plants, more than 200 species of exotic plants and over 400 species of thermophiles. 
  • Geology – The park is home to one of the world’s largest calderas with over 10,000 thermal features and more than 300 geysers. It has one of the world’s largest petrified forests. It has over 290 waterfalls with the 308′ Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River as it’s showpiece.
  • Yellowstone Lake is the largest (132 sq. mi.) high altitude (7,732′) lake in north America.
  • 9 visitor centers
  • 12 campgrounds (over 2,000 campsites)